Saturday, December 25, 2010

What Matters Most

From a sermon of Martin Luther on the Nativity.

How unobtrusively and simply do those events take place on earth that are so heralded in heaven!

On earth it happened in this wise: There was a poor young wife, Mary of Nazareth, among the meanest dwellers of the town, so little esteemed that none noticed the great wonder that she carried. She was silent, did not vaunt herself, but served her husband, who had no man or maid. They simply left the house. Perhaps they had a donkey for Mary to ride upon, though the Gospels say nothing about it, and we may well believe that she went on foot. The journey was certainly more than a day from Nazareth in Galilee to Bethlehem, which lies on the farther side of Jerusalem.

Joseph had thought, “When we get to Bethlehem, we shall be among relative and can borrow everything.” A fine idea that was! Bad enough that a young bride married only a year could not have had her baby at Nazareth in her own house instead of making all that journey of three days when heavy with child! How much worse that when she arrived there was no room for her! The inn was full. No one would release a room to this pregnant woman. She had to go to a cow stall and there bring forth the Maker of all creatures because nobody would give way.

Shame on you, wretched Bethlehem! The inn ought to have been burned with brimstone, for even though Mary had been a beggar maid or unwed, anybody at such a time should have been glad to give her a hand.

There are many of you in this congregation who think to yourselves: “If only I had been there! How quick I would have been to help the Baby! I would have washed his linen. How happy I would have been to go with the shepherds to see the Lord lying in the manger!” Yes, you would! You say that because you know how great Christ is, but if you had been there at that time you would have done no better than the people of Bethlehem. Childish and silly thoughts are these! Why don’t you do it now? You have Christ your neighbor. You ought to serve him, for what you do to your neighbor in need you do to the Lord Christ himself.


The birth was still more pitiable. No one regarded this young wife bringing forth her first-born. No one took her condition to heart. No one noticed that in a strange place she had not the very least thing needful in childbirth. There she was without preparation: no light, no fire, in the dead of night, in thick darkness. No one came to give the customary assistance. The guests swarming in the inn were carousing, and no one attended to this woman. I think myself if Joseph and Mary had realized that her time was so close she might perhaps have been left in Nazareth. And now think what she could use for swaddling clothes – some garment she could spare, perhaps her veil - certainly not Joseph’s breeches, which are now on exhibition at Aachen.

Think, women, there was no one there to bathe the Baby. No warm water, nor even cold. No fire, no light. The mother was herself midwife and the maid. The cold manger was the bed and the bathtub. Who showed the poor girl what to do? She had never had a baby before. I am amazed that the little one did not freeze. Do not make of Mary a stone. For the higher people are in the favor of God, the more tender are they.

Let us, then, meditate upon the Nativity just as we see it happening in our own babies. Behold Christ lying in the lap of this young mother. What can be sweeter than the Babe, what more lovely than the mother! What fairer than her youth! What more gracious than her virginity! Look at the Child, knowing nothing. Yet all that is belongs to him, that your conscience should not fear but take comfort in him. Doubt nothing.

To me there is no greater consolation given to mankind than this, that Christ became man, a child, a babe, playing in the lap and at the breasts of his most gracious mother. Who is there whom this sight would not comfort? Now is overcome the power of sin, death, hell, conscience, and guilt, if you come to this gurgling Babe and believe that he is come, not to judge you, but to save.


With love from me and my family....a happy, blessed Christmas, and a joyous New Year, to every one of you.

Dan (North Dallas Thirty)

8 comments:

theloverthedreamertheclown said...

This seemed as good a time as any to say that I'm a huge fan of yours. I always look forward to reading your commentary on political sites. Often, I'll open a comments page just to be able to see what North Dallas Thirty has to say about it. Thanks for being so goshdarn clever!

North Dallas Thirty said...

Well, let me be the first to tell you to get a life.

theloverthedreamertheclown said...

You demand the impossible, sir.

ME said...

I give you credit for having some balls to be as conservative as you claim to be in a very liberal city like San Francisco considering how many enemies you would make overnight if the "liberal" people in that city knew what you looked like.

The Editor said...

Shut the fuck up, moron.

boinky said...

So you condemn all your readers for a birth in the equivalent of a basement storage room in their relative's home (which is what Biblical scholars now call the room where Mary delivered).

Fine. But unless you have given up a few years of your life to deliver babies in Zimbabwe or another third world pest hole, leave me out of your condemnation please.

Words are cheap.

Quilly_Mammoth said...

Boinky...Zimbabwe doesn't let most foreign medical in. But over the years I've been a part of operations to improve the health of women and babies in Central America. It's a miracle, and a blessing to be a part of.

But I won't condemn you. For you know not of what you speak about, you just repeat feelings without facts. Stop hating and you will feel better. Maybe you can do it w/o a Supreme Being...I need His help constantly.

Yeah said...

Cutting medicare by $10 billion is cowardly. Better idea! Don't cut Medicare at all, and cut military spending an additional $10 billion.

Blocking someone on Twitter is also pretty cowardly.